Monday, March 11, 2013

Tax Credits for Window Replacement

#CraftsmanDirect.com wants to help you both save money and understand #WindowReplacement.

#WindowReplacement not only reduces drafts which increases the efficiency of your home cooling and heating systems, but it can also award you tax credits for doing so! Your house looks better, works better and costs less.

Choosing the type of #window you want can quickly become over-whelming. There are choices to make on what type of material your window frame should be, what kind of opening mechanism you should have, whether to have single or double pane windows, and what--if anything--to glaze (or coat) your windows with! Moreover, the Department of Energy suggests using different combinations of these window aspects depending on what side of the house the windows are on.

Today we'll look at window glass.

Windows with 2 or more panes of glass are considered "insulated". In this situation the panes of glass form a sealed box in which different kinds of gases are placed, most commonly krypton or argon, that helps keep heat on the proper side of the glass (out or in). Sometimes no special gas is used and it's just a sealed pocket of normal air, but this allows in more heat.

Window glass is often "glazed", or coated with some sort of substance that can produce a multitude of effects. Color tints can do everything from reduce glare to impede heat transfer, depending on the color used. Tints can reduce a specific spectrum of light or control heat transfer. Tints that focus on reducing heat transfer and do not control the light spectrum are called "low-emissivity coatings." These are very expensive, but very effective. There are also reflective coatings that create a mirror finish, but those are best used on office buildings as light is blocked but not heat.

This is an extremely basic look at window glass. Glazing comes in many colors and is composed of a variety of substances that can be mixed and matched to create the most ideal situation of light and heat requirements. Talk to someone at CraftsmanDirect.com or call us at 919-612-9000 to discuss your window needs.

More information can be obtained at www.Energy.gov.


No comments:

Post a Comment